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Red Data Book 2008

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Introduction


The Singapore Red Data Book, first published in 1994, is an indispensable source of reference for conservation plans and efforts of various governmental and non-governmental organisations. It is an invaluable resource for students and researchers in their understanding and appreciation of Singapore’s biodiversity.

This new edition will be even more relevant and authoritative given the wide range of expert contributors and the use of vibrant images of threatened species across its pages. Such enhanced features will greatly strengthen its appeal and make it more accessible and attractive to the general public.

As the world becomes, increasingly concerned over the effects of climate change, its impact on the future of our natural environment, and the fate of the world’s flora and fauna, this book will galvanise more people into action towards nature conservation in Singapore, and will play a key role in shaping the long-term future of biodiversity in Singapore.

This updated version of the Red Data Book is co-edited by Geoffrey Davison (National Parks Board), Peter Ng (National University of Singapore) and Ho Hua Chew (Nature Society, Singapore) and kindly sponsored by Shell.

In line with making information more easily accessible, we would like to introduce the online version of the Red Data Book. Currently, information for a number of species are already available and we will continue to add about 10 species every month. In time to come, all the information contained in the Red Data Book will be available online. The update of the RDB is work in progress. So look out for new updates every month!

Click here to access the online version of the RDB

The Singapore Red Data Book


A collaboration by:

 
Nature Society (Singapore) NUS NParks


Sponsored by:

Shell



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Information is Updated on 19/05/2013