The King of Fruits: Ethnobotany and Diversity of the Durians

The durian is one of the most iconic fruits of Southeast Asia and is familiar to most Singaporeans. But did you know that there is more than one way to eat a durian fruit and that durian flowers can also be eaten? Have you seen a durian with a red husk, or a durian with red pulp? Did you know that there is a durian species named after Singapore?


Some 12 species of durian from around Southeast Asia are planted on the grounds of the Singapore Botanic Gardens. Two of these are native to Singapore and occur naturally in our forests. Come visit this exhibition and learn more about the King of Fruits and its relatives.    

 

Colourful durians from our region: Photo credit S. K Ganesan
Colourful durians from our region. Photo credit S. K. Ganesan

 

Flowers of the common edible durian, Durio zibethinus. Photo credit S. K Ganesan

Flowers of the common edible durian, durio zibethinus. Photo credit S. K. Ganesan.

 

Venue: Level 2, Centre for Ethnobotany (Ethnobotany Garden)

Nearest Entrance: Bukit Timah Gate (Botanic Gardens MRT)

Daily: (Opens 29 Nov 2021) 9am to 6pm (till 29 May 2022)

(Closed every last Wednesday of the Month)

Admission: Free entry

      

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