https://www.sbwr.org.sg/wetlands/photos/logo4.jpgwetlands
a publication of Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve


 

Vol 14 No 1

Water Regime Management

Bird Ringing 2006

Shorebird counts (2000-2006)

 

Water Regime Management
at Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve



By James Gan
Senior Conservation Officer
Jeremy Ang
Conservation Officer

 

https://www.sbwr.org.sg/wetlands/photos/141-1a.gifHave you ever visited Sungei Buloh and seen the two brackish water ponds in front of the Main Hide filled with water? And at other times found that one pond has exposed mudflats while the other is completely filled with water and vice versa regardless of the tide? What is the rationale for this water level regime?

The idea of managing the water levels in a wetland began with the desire to increase the number of migratory shorebirds that make use of Sungei Buloh. You see, historically and currently, Sungei Buloh acts as both a high tide roost site and a feeding ground for shorebirds but mainly as a high tide roost. When the tides are low across the northern coast of Singapore, these birds fly out from Sungei Buloh and forage on the tidal mudflats for polychaetes and mollusc. A few hours later when the water rolls in and submerge these mudflats at high tide, the birds need to find a roost to wait out the tides. Sungei Buloh serves to provide them this roost site within the ponds that have low water levels. And this is possible in Sungei Buloh, a forested mangrove area because of the network of existing bunds that have created ponds whose water levels can be regulated through the use of sluice channels and sluice gates.

https://www.sbwr.org.sg/wetlands/photos/141-1b.gifWater levels in three brackish water ponds within the wetland are currently managed as a system on a fortnightly cycle generally between the shorebird migratory months of July and April. Outside of the migratory months, the water levels are generally not regulated and natural tidal influences are maintained. At no point in time are any of the three ponds mudflats submerged for more than four days (or left exposed to dry out for also more than four days). For perspective, there are five other brackish water ponds in the wetland whose water levels are not regulated at all and are subject only to natural tidal influence.

What might happen to shorebirds should the water levels in all the ponds be left to natural tidal influences? The first effect would be the loss of valuable exposed mudflats for shorebirds to roost (and to a lesser degree, feed) on during high tide. These birds will have to find other areas to roost since the northern coastal flats of Singapore as well as Sungei Buloh would be submerged under water. And this will directly affect the number of shorebirds that are present (and can be observed) at Sungei Buloh during the high tide period. Should the shorebirds be unable to find alternative high tide roosts within close proximity to their feeding grounds, there is a possibility that the entire high tide roost cum feeding ground system (that is Sungei Buloh – Singapore north coast mudflats) may be abandoned for more suitable alternative systems in the region.

https://www.sbwr.org.sg/wetlands/photos/141-1c.gifAre there detrimental effects to the regulation of water levels in the three ponds? Over the years, we have found that leaving the ponds at low water level for periods of more than a week result in the drying out of the mud with consequent die off of the mud invertebrates. When two or three ponds are carefully operated with minimal drying out periods of four days or less, the benefits of water level regulation are evident.

The bottom line – Has the number of shorebirds in Sungei Buloh increased, decreased or remained stable over all these years? Analysis of the shorebird census data for Sungei Buloh has been made for the wetland’s seven most abundant shorebird species over a period of seven years (from 2000 to 2006).

The trends discerned are as follows:

Common Greenshank, Common Redshank, Pacific Golden Plover and Whimbrel – Increasing numbers during both southward and northward migration

Marsh Sandpiper – Stable numbers during both southward and northward migration

Mongolian Plover – Steady recovery in numbers during the southward migration after a dramatic and steep decrease observed in 2002 and 2003. Avoidance of the wetland during the northward migration since the spring of 2003.

Curlew Sandpiper – Erratic numbers during the southward migration. Avoidance of the wetland during the northward migration since the spring of 2001.

In summary, the current water regime management at Sungei Buloh serves its purpose.

Overall, the absolute number of shorebirds counted at Sungei Buloh is at its highest over the last seven (and even ten) years. More can be done to further improve the conservation management of the wetland’s biodiversity and in particular the shorebirds that make use of Sungei Buloh.

We invite concerned and interested people to contribute to the improvement of Sungei Buloh as a wetland thriving with biodiversity. Opportunities are available for volunteers in areas as diverse as research, guiding, educational outreach, photography and documentation. Interested? Call 67941401 or email at Nparks_sbwr@nparks.gov.sg

 

 


Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve

 


 

Vol 14 No 1

Water Regime Management

Bird Ringing 2006

Shorebird counts (2000-2006)

 

Bird Ringing 2006
at Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve



By James Gan
Senior Conservation Officer

 

Main article | Summary of records part 1 , part 2 | Longevity records

https://www.sbwr.org.sg/wetlands/photos/141-2e.gifBird ringing has been conducted at Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve (SBWR) since 1990. This article gives an overview of some of the results of the bird ringing effort at Sungei Buloh over the past year. In 2006, a total of 658 birds from 66 species were ringed. The ringing field works was carried out on scheduled days and nights throughout the year. A summary of the number of birds ringed in 2006 (and the previous six years) is provided in Table 1.

The most commonly ringed bird species were (Numbers ringed in brackets) : Pacific Golden Plover (89), Yellowvented Bulbul (72), Scalybreasted Munia (69), Common Redshank (61) and Collared Kingfisher (42). Compared to the previous year (2005 ringing results), the number of birds ringed has increased from 479 to 658. The increase is attributed to the additional hours of mist netting.

Four new species of birds were ringed for the first time at SBWR in 2006. They are the Dollarbird, Greater Coucal, Lanceolated Warbler and Oriental White-eye.

Other interesting species ringed include the Bluewinged Pitta, Greater Sand Plover, Ruddy Kingfisher, Ruddy Turnstone and Siberian Blue Robin. There were 62 recoveries from 21 species that had been ringed before 2006. The Common Redshank had the most recoveries with 10 birds while the Pacific Golden Plover saw 9 recoveries.

https://www.sbwr.org.sg/wetlands/photos/141-2d.gifOne use for the data obtained from recovered birds is the enabling of longevity records and the survival of the different bird species in the wild to be determined. A Common Redshank ringed on 1 Nov 1990 was recaptured (controlled) on 12 Sep 06. This is the oldest recaptured bird for Sungei Buloh with a retrap interval of 190 months (15 years 10 months). The longevity records based on birds recovered in 2006 are provided in Table 2.

There are other notable recoveries worth highlighting. An Oriental Magpie Robin had been recovered and found to have made Sungei Buloh its home for the past 10 years where it was first ringed in 1996. This suggests that the protection afforded by the wetland has helped this sought after bird in the song bird trade improve its chances to survive in the wild.

A Pallas Grasshopper Warbler mist netted in March had been ringed the previous year in May and is the first of its species to be controlled at Sungei Buloh.

A Lanceolated Warbler was ringed on 23 Feb 06 and retrapped on 5 May 06. This species is believed to be a migrant that breeds in Eastern Russia, Northern China, Japan and Korea. The recovery is evidence that Sungei Buloh could be serving as the wintering home for this individual bird.

A weight gain of about 10% was noted when the warbler was measured in May compared to its weight in Feb. This could indicate fattening in preparation for its migratory flight back to its breeding grounds.

Further work could help reveal information on the extent of fattening, and the arrival and departure dates as they pertain to the presence of the warbler in the wetland.

The ringing data also revealed that four Asian Paradise Flycatchers were netted with an early arrival recorded on 19 Jul, one individual in Sep and two individuals in Oct. Previous years had recorded at most one bird ringed for the year. The presence of Yellow-rumped Flycatchers (usually detected in the wetland through mist netting work) was confirmed when three individual flycatchers were ringed in October. October was also the month when a single Siberian Blue Robin was ringed. Yellow Bitterns appeared a month later in November 2006.

In summary, bird ringing in 2006 has continued to reveal surprises in the presence of bird species, their movements, abundance and survival in Sungei Buloh. Data collected is invaluable for the long-term conservation and management of the wetland reserve.

Comments or feedback? Email at Nparks_sbwr@nparks.gov.sg

https://www.sbwr.org.sg/wetlands/photos/141-2f.gif

Acknowledgements


This article is possible because of the field studies supported by NParks. Thanks to fellow ringers Ramakrishnan, Charles Lim, Mustaffa Hajar, Abdul Khalid, Jeremy Ang, Tay Soon Lian and Ong Hai Chwee for contributing to the ringing work. Many others assisted with the ringing including staff, volunteers and friends especially Halilah Ahmad, Supardi Mohd Shariff, Jack Wong and Jeanne Tan. Jeremy Ang, Tay Soon Lian and Ramakrishnan took a number of photographs and catalogued them for documentation purposes.

References

Wells, D. R. 1999. The Birds of the Thai-Malay Peninsula, Vol 1. Academic Press, San Diego

Wetlands Vol 8, No.1, April 2001, Bird Ringing in Sungei Buloh Nature Park in 2000,. Pp 7 –10, Publication of SBNP, National Parks Board, Singapore

Wetlands Vol 9, No.1, April 2002, Bird Ringing in Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve in 2001,. Pp 8 –11, Publication of SBWR, National Parks Board, Singapore

Wetlands Vol 10, No.1, April 2004, Bird Ringing in Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve in 2002,. Pp 6 – 8, Publication of SBWR, National Parks Board, Singapore

Wetlands Vol 10, No.2, Nov 2004, Bird Ringing in Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve in 2003,. Pp 8 – 11, Publication of SBWR, National Parks Board, Singapore

Wetlands Vol 10, No.4, Apr 2005, Bird Ringing in Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve in 2004,. Pp 6 – 9, Publication of SBWR, National Parks Board, Singapore

Wetlands Vol 10:7, Apr 2006, Bird Ringing in Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve in 2005,. Pp 7 – 10, Publication of SBWR, National Parks Board, Singapore

 

 


Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve

 

 


 

Vol 14 No 1

Water Regime Management

Bird Ringing 2006

Shorebird counts (2000-2006)

 

Bird Ringing 2006
at Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve



By James Gan
Senior Conservation Officer

 

Main article | Summary of records part 1 , part 2 | Longevity records

Table 1 part 1: Summary of individual birds ringed and retraps at Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve in 2006 and preceeding years (2000 to 2005)
https://www.sbwr.org.sg/wetlands/photos/141-2a.gif

 

 


Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve

 

 


 

Vol 14 No 1

Water Regime Management

Bird Ringing 2006

Shorebird counts (2000-2006)

 

Bird Ringing 2006
at Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve



By James Gan
Senior Conservation Officer

 

Main article | Summary of records part 1 , part 2 | Longevity records

Table 1 part 2: Summary of individual birds ringed and retraps at Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve in 2006 and preceeding years (2000 to 2005)
https://www.sbwr.org.sg/wetlands/photos/141-2b.gif

 

 


Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve

 

 


 

Vol 14 No 1

Water Regime Management

Bird Ringing 2006

Shorebird counts (2000-2006)

 

Bird Ringing 2006
at Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve



By James Gan
Senior Conservation Officer

 

Main article | Summary of records part 1 , part 2 | Longevity records

Table 2: Longevity Records (Selected species) At least 6 months for resident birds or 1 season for migrants
https://www.sbwr.org.sg/wetlands/photos/141-2c.gif

 

 


Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve

 

 

 


 

Vol 14 No 1

Water Regime Management

Bird Ringing 2006

Shorebird counts (2000-2006)

 

Shorebird Counts (2000-2006)
at Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve



By James Gan
Senior Conservation Officer

 

Main article | Peak High Tide Counts part 1, part 2 |
Comparison of selected species | Day Peak Counts

https://www.sbwr.org.sg/wetlands/photos/141-3h.gifSummary

Shorebirds from the Scolopacidae and Charadriidae were counted regularly in Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve between January 2000 and December 2006. A total of 23 species was recorded during the census sessions. Total shorebird numbers peaked in October, November or December for all years. The most abundant bird was the Pacific Golden Plover Pluvialis fulva with counts consistently exceeding 1,000 for all years since 2001 with a maximum of 2,000.

The counts have revealed information on the composition of shorebird species, their numbers and their presence in different months over the past seven years. More specifically, the relative importance of Sungei Buloh as a shorebird site in Singapore is reinforced. Data collected will help to improve the conservation work and management practices at Sungei Buloh for the next few years.

Introduction

This article is based on an earlier paper submitted by the same authors and published in The Stilt No.48 Oct 2005. It is an update of the shorebird count data obtained from monthly wader census conducted at SBWR with a brief analysis. It is also the intention of this update to prime people to take a greater interest and appreciation in the shorebirds of Singapore.

Results

A total of 23 species was recorded during the census sessions. Seven of the 23 species dominated with counts of at least 100 birds at any one session during the study period. Count data for these seven species for the period January 2000 to December 2006 are listed in Table 1. Note that the totals as given in the tables refer to the highest count for a given month and are not average counts.

For all years, maximum shorebird counts were in either November or December with the exception of 2006 when it peaked in October. Peak counts of shorebirds did not exceed 3,200 birds in any year. Only the Pacific Golden Plover had counts exceeding 1,000 birds. This occurred fairly regularly during both the periods for southward and northward migration. The only other shorebird with numbers exceeding a thousand was the Mongolian Plover Charadrius mongolus (1,003 on January 2000). Common Redshank Tringa totanus and Whimbrel Numenius phaeopus were the only two species noted in the boreal summer for 2001 to 2006 where they were present in very low numbers (below 20 birds) except in June 2003 when no shorebirds were observed.

To generalise, the species with the highest numbers recorded during the southward migration (Sep/Oct/Nov) relative to their numbers throughout the year were Common Redshank, Mongolian Plover and Curlew Sandpiper. Species with the highest numbers recorded during the northward migration (Mar/Apr) were Pacific Golden Plover and Whimbrel. Species with the highest numbers in the northern mid winter (Dec/Jan) were Common Greenshank and Marsh Sandpiper.

Species Account

A comparison was made of the seven most common shorebird species at the reserve with the maximum counts recorded by the Asian Waterfowl Census (AWC) for Singapore between 1991 and 2001 (Perennou & Mundkur 1991, 1992; Mundkur & Taylor 1993; Lopez & Mundkur 1997; Li & Mundkur 2004). Direct comparison is possible for counts taken in January since the AWC counts are consistently conducted in that month at low tide. The percentage of each species of shorebird that can be found in the reserve against the Singapore population is at best a rough estimate but still an indicator of the relative importance of the reserve with respect to other sites in Singapore. The relevant data are given in Table 2.

https://www.sbwr.org.sg/wetlands/photos/141-3a.gifCommon Greenshank
Tringa nebularia

Trend:
Increased numbers during both southward and northward migration The maximum count at the wetland was 364 recorded in Nov 2005. It seems likely that during high tide about half the population of Greenshanks in Singapore use the wetland as a roost.

https://www.sbwr.org.sg/wetlands/photos/141-3b.gifCommon Redshank
Tringa totanus

Trend:
Increased numbers during both southward and northward migration The maximum count was 683 recorded in Sep 2000. The peaks in September followed by a 60% to 70% drop the following month in 2000, 2001 and 2002 provide some indication of turnover rates for Redshanks on passage.

https://www.sbwr.org.sg/wetlands/photos/141-3c.gifCurlew Sandpiper
Calidris ferruginea

Trend:
Erratic numbers during the southward migration. Avoidance of the wetland during the northward migration since the spring of 2001 The maximum count was 519 in Oct 2006. The 1991-2001 counts for Singapore range from 5 to 781. First migrants were recorded in August. Since 2001, negligible (less than 10) numbers of birds were present between January and July. The data and observation could be explained by the possibility that since 2001, Curlew Sandpipers take a northward migration route that bypass or use other wetlands in Singapore or the region. Such an alternative route could possibly be along the eastern coast of Sumatra before crossing over to Malaysia and/or Thailand. Large numbers of Curlew Sandpiper occur along the east coast of Sumatra at this time (A. Crossland pers. comm.). Wader counts at suitable sites in Indonesia and the Malay Peninsula would help to clarify the actual route taken. The peak counts in October for most years indicate a strong southward passage in that month before falling sharply in January for the northward migration.

https://www.sbwr.org.sg/wetlands/photos/141-3d.gifMarsh Sandpiper
Tringa stagnatilis

Trend:
Stable numbers during both southward and northward migration. The maximum count was 486 observed in Dec 2001. Counts for Singapore range from 526 and 1294. Birds arrive at the wetland in appreciable numbers only from October. The data collected are consistent with the observations in the Malay Peninsula where Marsh Sandpipers arrive late and depart relatively early with a further peak in the boreal spring (Wells 1999). This surge was noted in early April 2001 but not in 2000. It may however have happened between count dates and was therefore unrecorded.

https://www.sbwr.org.sg/wetlands/photos/141-3e.gifMongolian Plover
Charadrius mongolus

Trend:
Steady recovery in numbers during the southward migration after a dramatic and steep decrease observed in 2002 and 2003; Avoidance of the wetland during the northward migration since the spring of 2003. The maximum count of 1,003 was recorded on 26 January 2000. Another count of 878 was recorded on 10 February 2000. AWC counts for Singapore have recorded historic peaks of up to 1,000 birds. Observations in the Malay Peninsula have generally noted decreases in Mongolian Plover numbers from December to March (Wells 1999). These observations are consistent with the pattern of counts recorded for all years when counts are generally highest in December and decrease as the northward migration progresses. This may indicate a boreal spring exodus without significant augmentation by passage migrants. High tide counts taken from a boat in the West Johore Straits on 3 Jan 03 revealed up to 600 Mongolian Plovers resting on floating pontoons. The following year, on 6 Feb 04, 200 Mongolian Plovers were counted at the same pontoons during high tide. Thus it would seem, unlike the Curlew Sandpiper, that the main northward migration route of Mongolian Plovers continues to include the vicinity of Sungei Buloh. Further monitoring and implementation of various habitat management measures at Sungei Buloh may help to reveal the reasons for the general avoidance of the wetland in favour of the pontoons during the northward migration period.

https://www.sbwr.org.sg/wetlands/photos/141-3f.gifPacific Golden Plover
Pluvialis fulva

Trend:
General increase in numbers during both the periods of southward and northward migration. Counts exceeded 1,000 birds in all years except 2000. A mid-winter peak count of 2000 was recorded in Jan 2005 and this number is unusual as Jan counts for Pacific Golden Plovers in previous years had never exceeded 1,000 birds. It could however indicate some disturbance at the Mandai Mudflats where records of Pacific Golden Plovers exceeding 2,000 birds at low tide have been recorded. The southward migration in the same year confirmed this number with a peak of 1,735 birds counted in Nov 2005. The following year also saw an unusually high surge of Pacific Golden Plovers in Jan 2006 with a count of 1,321 birds. AWC counts for Singapore range from 908 to 2416. There appears to be a trend that more Pacific Golden Plovers are making use of Sungei Buloh. The reasons are not clear but could be due to the loss of previously derelict land in the Kranji area that had been used by the plovers as a high tide roost area and which was in 2005 and 2006 being redeveloped resulting in the plovers moving to Sungei Buloh as the next best high tide roost. The count of 1,081 birds in April 2001 suggests staging during northward migration.

https://www.sbwr.org.sg/wetlands/photos/141-3g.gifWhimbrel
Numenius phaeopus
Trend:
Increased numbers during both southward and northward migration A maximum count of 442 was obtained. That count was taken in Nov 2003 and likely involves birds passing through and making use of Sungei Buloh as a stop over site. Significant increases in Whimbrels from the preceding months in April 2001 (219 birds), Mar 2002 (215 birds), Mar 2004 (301 birds), Apr 2005 (320 birds) and Apr 2006 (268 birds) might indicate staging. The high counts of Whimbrels in Mar and April quickly slumps to generally 20 birds or less in early May. Some Whimbrels may have over summered in Singapore as small numbers were present throughout May, June and July in most years. First arrivals were noted in late July or early August and a large influx of birds was noted in September for most years.

DISCUSSION


This study of shorebird count data from the years 2000 to 2006 has shown that generally, for counts between September and March (Table 3), over 1,000 shorebirds may be expected at SBWR during the high tide period. From May to July, only a few species of shorebirds can be found, usually Common Redshank and Whimbrel with fewer than 30 individuals. From the census data for the seven years period, the shorebird community at the reserve is composed of seven main species and sixteen other species that occur in much smaller numbers. These in descending order of abundance are Common Sandpiper Tringa hypoleucos, Terek Sandpiper Tringa cinerea, Broadbilled Sandpiper Limicola falcinellus, Ruddy Turnstone Arenaria interpres, Bar-tailed Godwit Limosa lapponica, Little Ringed Plover Charadrius dubius, Great Knot Calidris tenuirostris, Pintail Snipe Gallinago sterura, Eurasian Curlew Numenius arquata, Grey-tailed Tattler Tringa brevipes, Grey Plover Pluvialis squatarola, Red-necked Stint Calidris ruficollis, and Black-tailed Godwit Limosa limosa, Little Curlew Numenius minutes, Greater Sand Plover Charadrius leschenaultii and Asian Dowitcher Limnodromus semipalmatus. Other shorebird species, for example Black-winged Stilt Himantopus himantopus observed at the reserve in 2005 (Tay 2006) were not recorded during the actual census sessions.

Preliminary data obtained through the counts and observations suggest that the wetland is favoured by perhaps more than 80% of the Singapore population of Whimbrel, Mongolian Plover (except during the northward migration period when they completely avoid the wetland) and Pacific Golden Plover. The data also suggest that about 50% of the Common Greenshank and 30% of the Marsh Sandpiper and Common Redshank population use the wetland as a high tide roost. About 10% of the Curlew Sandpiper population is thought to use Sungei Buloh as a high tide roost. Further studies would be required to confirm these hypotheses. More frequent counts over a longer period would help to establish patterns of seasonal abundance, distribution and movements of shorebirds in Singapore. A limitation of the data obtained during the study period is that a substantial influx of passage waders might last only a few days and might be missed through slipping between counts that are spaced at wider intervals. Closer-spaced counts during migration periods would refine our knowledge of the exact magnitude and timing of passage peaks. The data presented, though limited by resource constraints, is however sufficient to give an indicative picture of the seasonal abundance of shorebirds at Sungei Buloh. It is clear that the Sungei Buloh wetland area is an important site for these shorebirds. Similar sites in Singapore and around Singapore may possibly reveal similar species, similar monthly counts and composition of species.

Acknowledgements

The counts were possible through the assistance of the Conservation Officers and Rangers at Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve. In particular we would like to register our appreciation to Abdul Khalid Hamid, Mustaffa Hajar, Charles Lim Sim Moh, Patricia Phua Lee Kheng, Lim Yew Soon, Jack Wong and the late Ong Hai Chwee for logistical assistance.

References

Gan, J. and Ramakrishnan, R.K. 2002. Shorebird Monitoring in Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve in 2001, Wetlands Vol 9, No. 1, Pp13. Publication of SBWR, National Parks Board, Singapore

Gan, J. and Ramakrishnan, R.K. 2005. Notes on shorebird numbers in Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve in 2000 and 2001. The Stilt 48:38-41

Li, Z.W.D. and Mundkur, T. 2004. Numbers and distribution of waterbirds and wetlands in the Asia- Pacific region. Results of the Asian Waterbird Census: 1997-2001. Wetlands International, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

Li, Z.W.D. et. al. 2007. Numbers and distribution of waterbirds and wetlands in the Asia-Pacific region. Results of the Asian Waterbird Census: 2002-2004. Wetlands International, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

Lopez, A., and Mundkur, T., (Eds). 1997. The Asian Waterfowl Census 1994-1996. Wetlands International. Kuala Lumpur

Mundkur, T., and Taylor, V., 1993. Asian Waterfowl Census 1993, Asian Wetland Bureau & The International Waterfowl and Wetlands Research Bureau

Perennou, C., and Mundkur, T., 1991. Asian Waterfowl Census 1991, Asian Wetland Bureau & The International Waterfowl and Wetlands Research Bureau

Perennou, C., and Mundkur, T., 1992. Asian and Australasian Waterfowl Census 1992, Asian Wetland Bureau & The International Waterfowl and Wetlands Research Bureau

Tay S. L., 2006. The Day a Super St__ flew into Bulohwood, Wetlands Vol 10:7, Pp15. Publication of SBWR, National Parks Board, Singapore

Wells, D.R. 1999. The Birds of the Thai-Malay Peninsula, Vol 1. Academic Press, San Diego

 

 


Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve

 


 

Vol 14 No 1

Water Regime Management

Bird Ringing 2006

Shorebird counts (2000-2006)

 

Shorebird Counts (2000-2006)
at Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve



By James Gan
Senior Conservation Officer

 

Main article | Peak High Tide Counts part 1, part 2 |
Comparison of selected species | Day Peak Counts


Table 1 part 1: Peak High Tide Counts of each Wader Species for each Month at Sungei Buloh from 2000 to 2006
https://www.sbwr.org.sg/wetlands/photos/141-3i.gif

 

 


Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve

 

 


 

Vol 14 No 1

Water Regime Management

Bird Ringing 2006

Shorebird counts (2000-2006)

 

Shorebird Counts (2000-2006)
at Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve



By James Gan
Senior Conservation Officer

 

Main article | Peak High Tide Counts part 1, part 2 |
Comparison of selected species | Day Peak Counts


Table 1 part 2: Peak High Tide Counts of each Wader Species for each Month at Sungei Buloh from 2000 to 2006
https://www.sbwr.org.sg/wetlands/photos/141-3j.gif

 

 


Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve

 

 

 


 

Vol 14 No 1

Water Regime Management

Bird Ringing 2006

Shorebird counts (2000-2006)

 

Shorebird Counts (2000-2006)
at Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve



By James Gan
Senior Conservation Officer

 

Main article | Peak High Tide Counts part 1, part 2 |
Comparison of selected species | Day Peak Counts


Table 2: Summary and comparison of Singapore’s totals of selected species of shorebirds counted during the Asian Waterbird Census (1991 - 2004) and shorebirds counted in Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve (2000-2006).
https://www.sbwr.org.sg/wetlands/photos/141-3k.gif

 

 


Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve

 

 


 

Vol 14 No 1

Water Regime Management

Bird Ringing 2006

Shorebird counts (2000-2006)

 

Shorebird Counts (2000-2006)
at Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve



By James Gan
Senior Conservation Officer

 

Main article | Peak High Tide Counts part 1, part 2 |
Comparison of selected species | Day Peak Counts



Table 3: Sungei Buloh Shorebird Census Data 2000-2006 -Day Peak Counts in each Month
https://www.sbwr.org.sg/wetlands/photos/141-3l.gif

 

 


Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve