https://www.sbwr.org.sg/wetlands/photos/logo5a.jpg
a publication of Sungei Buloh Nature Park


 

Vol 4 No 2
Aug 97


June Vacation Workshop
for children


Mangrove Crabs of Sungei Buloh

Timberland
Earth Day Programme


List of Common Migrant Birds
at Sungei Buloh

 

Come Experience the
Wild Side of Life
The June Vacation Workshop

Children of urban Singapore studying science in a vacuum.

Failure to relate textbook materials with reality.

These are but some problems we discovered while bringing our school children around the Park.

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To address these issues and to bring children closer to nature, one-day nature workshops based on the theme, "Adaptation in Nature" were conducted on 3 and 5 June for the 11- to 12-year olds.

Each day, 20 children were at the Park from 9 am to 5 pm for a complete nature study experience, with opportunities to take part in activities they would usually not have time for during their school excursions.

Their day of learning consisted of games and nature rambles, based on the theme, "Adaptations in Nature". The children enjoyed themselves immensely, especially the nature rambles.

For many of them, it was the first time they had the chance to get up close and personal with unusual but interesting creatures like mudskippers, horseshoe crabs, archerfish, creeper shells and changeable lizards.
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Collen Goh


Dawning Rendezvous
Linda Goh


23 February 1997
7.00am
Grey Skies threatened the day...With fingers crossed, I made my way to Singapore's only remaining patch of primary rainforest to meet up with our Park volunteers.

7.30am The sky cleared. Our guide, Mr Eugene Tang had already arrived. Eugene conducted a short briefing before setting off with the group. My sister and 1 stayed behind to 'catch' the late corners.

As we made our way up to catch up with the rest, we were greeted by a chorus of cicadas. We were excited with the experience of the hilly wonders. The whole forest was pulsating with life!

Eugene took time to introduce the Dipterocarp family, a characteristic species of the primary forest. Towering above us were the majestic Shorea curtisii, the most common member of the family. Treading on the Kruing Path, we spotted the Bat Lily, named for its resemblance to bats with ears sticking out. Growing below the canopy layer , many species of fungi flourish. The Bracket fungus grew in layers on dead tree trunks.

With much heaving and panting, we managed a steep rocky path. Lactic acid had started accumulating in our muscles and we decided to take a break and to have a group picture taken.

Cool breeze. Beautiful sights. The summit provided a breath-taking view of Singapore. Unfortunately we did not spot any birds.

11.00 am
We quickened our footsteps to get back to the Visitor's Centre, where food awaits. Upon reaching the bottom of the hill, we proceeded to the seminar room and, through a well-produced slide presentation, were once again taken along the trails of the reserve. The whole event ended at about noon and we were all looking forward to our next gathering in September. Destination? Pulau Ubin.

Our next series of workshops will be held in December, based on the theme "Bird Migration". Participants (aged 11-12) will have a choice of either 9 or 12 Dee 1997. The workshop will be held at the Park from 9.00 am to 5 pm. The fee of $40 will include meals and relevant materials required for the one-day workshop (transportation not included).

 

 


Sungei Buloh Nature Park

 

 

 

 


 

Vol 4 No 2
Aug 97


June Vacation Workshop
for children


Mangrove Crabs of Sungei Buloh

Timberland
Earth Day Programme


List of Common Migrant Birds
at Sungei Buloh

 

Just a Crabby Note

Linda Goh


https://www.sbwr.org.sg/wetlands/photos/417.jpgHave you ever experienced walking along the Mangrove Boardwalk when it is high tide and have the creepy feeling that many eyes are following you? Well, fear not. Look hard and you will soon discover they are only well-camouflaged Mangrove Crabs peering at you.

Some of these crab are seen climbing up the mangrove trees and sometimes even the boardwalk to avoid the incoming tide. They are known to crawl just high enough to remain above the sea level. One possible reason for this could be to escape predators that lurk in the deep mysteroius waters of the mangroves.

To survive on atmospheric air, these sesarmines possess net-like patterns on the sides of their shells, which enables them to recirculate water in the gill chambers so that they can breath on land. Two commonly observed mangrove crabs found in the Park are the Episesarma sp. and Chiromantes sp. Ecologically, these crabs are known to be important. By feeding on the mangrove leaves that have fallen from the canopy, these sesarmid crabs help to initiate the breakdown of these leaves, which are otherwise difficult to decompose.

Crabby Stuff

My neighbour didn't mind me digging and scraping at his home today, quite unlike his usual self. The grouchy, muddy Mr. Mud-lobster is minding his own business, excavating another tunnel to expand his territory. The homes we share are like volcanoes springing up on the mangrove swamp.

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Mr Mud Lobster


https://www.sbwr.org.sg/wetlands/photos/413.jpgPeople, adults and children alike, would walk on strange-looking structures they call boardwalks to look at me. I hate their stares and will normally go back into my home without much ado. Sure hope they'll mind their own business. Of course there are times when I can't run from the stares. When it is high tide and my home is flooded, I will have to climb up the branches of my favourite Rhizophora apiculata (a mangrove tree, for those ignorant you!). Mr. Rhizophora Sir, by the way, is very grateful for my existence. I like to eat the leaves that have fallen off him. In return, I process (pass out!) the leaves for him in easily absorbed form. You could say we all live in harmony and what humans call co-existence in an ecosystem. What a mouthful!

For a humorous look at Tree Climbing Crabs in Singapore Mangroves (Vol 6 No 1 Apr 99)

 

 


Sungei Buloh Nature Park

 

 

 

 


 

Vol 4 No 2
Aug 97


June Vacation Workshop
for children


Mangrove Crabs of Sungei Buloh

Timberland
Earth Day Programme


List of Common Migrant Birds
at Sungei Buloh

 

No Accidental Tourist
Common migrants at the Park

Lim Haw Chuan

 

Little Heron
Chinese Pond-Heron
Cattle Egret
Great Egret
Black-Crowned Night-Heron
Schrenck's Bittern
Black Bittern
Black Baza
Japanese Sparrowhawk
Watercock
Pacific Golden Plover
Little Ringed Plover
Mongolian Plover
Whimbrel
Black-tailed Godwit
Spotted Redshank
Common Redshank

Marsh Sandpiper
Common Greenshank
Wood Sandpiper
Terek Sandpiper
Common Sandpiper
Asian Dowitcher
Rufous-necked Stint
Broad-billed Sandpiper
Common Koel
Common Kingfisher
Black-capped Kingfisher
Blue-tailed Bee-eater
Blue-throated Bee-cater
Hirundinidae: Swallows
Barn Swallow
Brown Shrike
Tiger Shrike

 

 


Sungei Buloh Nature Park

 

 

 

 


 

Vol 4 No 2
Aug 97


June Vacation Workshop
for children


Mangrove Crabs of Sungei Buloh

Timberland
Earth Day Programme


List of Common Migrant Birds
at Sungei Buloh

 

Timberland
Earth Day Programme

Linda Goh


https://www.sbwr.org.sg/wetlands/photos/418.jpg20 classic mini cars dotted the carpark at the Sungei Buloh Nature Park! The occasion? Timberland's Earth Day celebration the Park. As reported in Berita Harian, 20 April 1997 was indeed a fine Sunday for at least 40 children who were waltzed to the Park in a convoy of 20 classic mini cars.

The day started on a high note with the children from Bukit Ho Swee Social Centre and Toa Payoh CDAC being introduced to the Park by our staff. The children were taken around Route 1 where they were greet by some of our feathered friends who were probably on their last flight back home. They also learnt about the different habitats that are found in the Park. This event was jointly organised by Timberland and Sungei Buloh Nature Park to educate the children, aged 8 to 10, on the importance of conserving our natural heritage.

What better way to expose our young to nature than to let them have a feel of it first hand. From 21 March to 22 April 1997, the public was encouraged to make their contributions towards nature conservation by dropping their loose change into pledge boxes located at Timberland stores. Proceeds from the sale of the exclusive Timberland caps were also donated to the Park. The funds collected from this event will be channelled towards the Park's conservation education efforts.

We thank Timberland and the public for their support.

 

 


Sungei Buloh Nature Park