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Windsor Nature Park

14 Feb 2015

MEDIA FACTSHEET                                                                                

Windsor Nature Park

Windsor Nature Park is a 75-hectare nature area located off Venus Drive at the Upper Thomson area.

It is one of four new nature parks which will serve as green buffers to the Central Catchment Nature Reserve. These parks – which include Springleaf, Chestnut and Thomson Nature Parks – will help to reduce visitorship pressure on the nature reserves by providing interesting alternative venues for the public to enjoy nature-related activities. The development of these nature parks is part of a holistic approach to strengthen the conservation of the biodiversity in Singapore’s nature reserves.

Map of Central Catchment Nature Reserve
Figure 1 Map of the Central Catchment Nature Reserve and the Surrounding Nature Parks that act as buffers to the reserve

The current 75-hectare site is largely forested and rich in biodiversity. It serves as a habitat to many animals, both native and migratory. These include frogs, squirrels, dragonflies and damselflies. The freshwater streams in Venus Drive are also home to many native species such as the Malayan Forest Betta (Betta pugnax), the Common Barb (Puntius binotatus) and the Tree Fern (Cyathea latebrosa).

The intent is to sensitively enhance the forest habitats and restore existing trails. Enhancement works include the building of boardwalks to complement the existing trails. The total trail length in the park will be 4.1km. Basic amenities such as restrooms and shelters will be provided.

Works for the site is targeted to start in mid-2015 and to be completed by end 2016.

Surrounding area of Windsor Nature Park
Figure 2 Map of the trails and surrounding area of the new Windsor Nature Park
Overall plans for Windsor Nature Park
Figure 3 Overall plans for Windsor Nature Park
Aerial view of Windsor Nature Park entrance
Figure 4 Aerial view of the park entrance (Artist’s impressions)
Windsor Nature Park
Figure 5 Wetlands and reforestation at the park entrance improves the existing habitats (Artist’s impressions)
New crossing over stream
Figure 6 New crossing over stream (Artist’s impressions) 
Nature Trail at Windsor Nature Park
Figure 7 Nature trails at Windsor Nature Park

100 native trees were planted at the site of the new Windsor Park as part of reforestation efforts. Minister of State for National Development, Desmond Lee, and grassroots advisor Hri Kumar planted a Kayu Gaharu (Aquilaria malaccensis).

1

Kayu Gaharu

Kayu Gaharu

(Aquilaria malaccensis)

This plant grows in lowland primary and secondary forests and can reach up to 40m in height. It is highly valued as a major source of agarwood, which is used for perfume, incense and in insect repellent. Due to illegal harvest and trade, its conservation status has been classified as vulnerable under IUCN.

Photo credit: NParks Flora and Fauna web

2

Kayu Arang

Kayu Arang

(Cratoxylum cochinchinense)

This is a tree that is found in primary and secondary forests that can grow up to 20m tall. The tree has faintly fragrant flowers that have deep crimson to pink or pinkish-yellow petals. It is the preferred local food plant for caterpillars of the butterflies, the Archduke (Lexias pardalis dirteana) and the Common Grass Yellow (Eurema hecabe contubernalis).

Photo credit: NParks Flora and Fauna web

3

Buah Salam

Buah Salam

(Syzygium polyanthum)

This is a tree that can grow up to 30m tall. It produces fleshy fruits that are consumed by various types of birds, such as the Jambu Fruit Dove (Ptilinopus jambu) and Cream-vented Bulbul (Pycnonotus simplex). The young leaves are a commonly used spice in vegetable and rice dishes such as curries and stews.

Photo credit: NParks Flora and Fauna web

4

Spicate Eugenia

Spicate Eugenia

(Syzygium zeylanicum)

This tree can grow up to 18 m tall. The young leaves are purplish to brownish pink and very glossy and it produces flowers that are white and faintly fragrant. Its oblong fleshy fruits are eaten by birds, squirrels and other fruit-eating animals. The sweetly scented berries are edible and its leaves can be made into an infusion to treat stomach upsets.

Photo credit: NParks Flora and Fauna web

5

Sepetir Daun Tebal

Sepetir Daun Tebal

(Sindora wallichii)

This tree can reach a height of 50 m and has a wide-spreading and flat-topped crown with small yellow-brown flowers. It has distinctively disc-shape legumes which are spiny as fruits. The legumes enclose a curious-looking aril-covered seed. Rodents eat the fleshy seeds and help disperse them in the process.

Photo credit: NParks Flora and Fauna web

6

Tembusu

Tembusu

(Cyrtophyllum fragrans)

The Tembusu tree can reach up to 55m tall. It has a deep fissured bark and buttress roots up to 2.5m tall. The strong timber is long-lasting and resistant to termites. Its flowers are visited by butterflies and moths and the fruits and seeds are eaten and dispersed by birds and bats. This slow-growing tree is featured on the back of the Singapore five-dollar note.

Photo credit: NParks Flora and Fauna web

7

Corkwood

Corkwood

(Carallia brachiata)

This tree grows up to 20m tall. It is the preferred local food plant or host plant for the caterpillars of the Teak Defoliator Moth (Hyblaea puera). Its flowers are insect-pollinated, and its edible red fruits are consumed by birds. The wood is also a source of good-quality firewood and charcoal.

Photo credit: NParks Flora and Fauna web

8

Oil Fruit

Oil Fruit

(Elaeocarpus mastersii)

The Oil Fruit tree is fairly common in both primary and secondary forests as well as at the forest edge and can grow up to 20m in height. Its tiny flowers are creamy-white or greenish. Its fruits and seeds are eaten and dispersed by birds

Photo credit: NParks Flora and Fauna web

9

Kelumpang Burong

Kelumpang Burong

(Sterculia parviflora)

The Kelumpang Burong is a deciduous tree that grows up to 35m tall. The large scarlet seedpods contain large black seeds, characteristic of this species. Squirrels will gnaw through the outer layer of the seedpod to obtain the black seeds within before they open.

Photo credit: NParks Flora and Fauna web

10

Tempinis

Tempinis

(Streblus elongates)

This is a bushy evergreen tree that grows between 12-30m in height. The leaves are easily recognisable due to its unique shape. Its flowers are insect-pollinated and the seeds and fruits are said to be eaten and dispersed by monkeys.

Photo credit: NParks Flora and Fauna web


Unique Fauna

Frogs: Singing Sentinels

Frogs and tadpoles have semi-permeable skin making them highly sensitive to toxins and pollutants in the environment. Their presence in the park is an indication that the freshwater habitats are of healthy water quality.

Masked Rough-sided Frog Copper-cheeked Frog

Figure 8 Copper-cheeked Frog (Left) and Masked Rough-sided Frog (Right), two members of the amphibian family that indicate good freshwater quality at Windsor Nature Park

Photo credit: Chung Yi Fei

Squirrels: Collectors of the Forest

Squirrels play a very important role and are essential to the regeneration of our forest. They feed on fruits and insects and help to disperse the seeds of our native plants throughout the nature reserve.

Slender Squirrel Horsfield’s Flying Squirrel
Figure 9 Slender Squirrel (Left) and Horsfield’s Flying Squirrel (Right), both of which are being threatened by the fragmenting of their habitats.

Photo credit: Chung Yi Fei

Dragonflies and Damselflies

Young dragonflies and damselflies spend their nymph stages underwater. This can range from a few months to a few years. The nymphs of these insects are sensitive to the quality of the water and clean water is critical to their survival.

Handsome GrenadlerCommon Flashwing
Figure 10 Handsome Grenadier (Left) and Common Flashwing (Right). These winged wonders are highly valued as nature's pest controllers as they are predators of mosquitoes both in water and in the air. 

Photo credit: Robin Ngiam

Freshwater Streams

The freshwater streams at Windsor are rich in biodiversity. The forest effectively cleans the water that enters it through a natural filtration process carried out by the root system of plants and the various layers of soils in the forest floor. The resulting water is free from impurities and sediments, allowing the flora and fauna in the area to thrive.

Freshwater stream
Figure 11 Freshwater stream at Windsor Nature Park

Photo credit: Chung Yi Fei

 
Last updated on 09 July 2018

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