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Conditions for Importing & Exporting CITES Species (Plants)

Import of CITES plants and its products into Singapore

All imports of live plants, seeds and certain plant products into Singapore require a phytosanitary certificate to validate that they conform to our phytosanitary requirements. In addition, CITES permits are required for all imports of CITES-listed plant species, unless they are specifically exempted under the Convention.

Please refer to the following guide for the import requirements for CITES-listed plants and plant products:

Type  Appendix Would you require a CITES export permit from country of origin/re-export? Would you require a CITES import permit from NParks? Additional Information
 Live plants (eg. Orchids, Cacti) I Yes Yes

Import is permitted only for artificially propagated CITES-listed species under Appendix I

Imports of wild CITES-listed species (Appendix I) will be considered on a case-to-case basis.

 II and III Yes No (for plants that are artificially propagated)  

For the import of wild CITES-listed species under Appendix II and III, you require an NParks-issued CITES import permit.

 Dead plants, parts and products (eg. manufactured products from Rosewood, Agarwood) I Yes Yes  
II and III Yes Yes  

*There are permit exemptions accorded to certain CITES-listed plant species. Please refer to “The Schedule of the Endangered Species (Import and Export) Act” for more details. If in doubt, please write to us at www.nparks.gov.sg/feedback.

Please obtain all shipping documents including CITES permits and TradeNet Cargo Clearance Permits prior to the arrival of your consignment to Singapore. For more information on how to obtain the relevant permits, please refer to our guidelines here. You may proceed to arrange for the import of the CITES-listed plant species after you have obtained the necessary documents.

At arrival, original copies of the CITES permits must be presented to NParks or ICA officers at the port of entry, for inspection and/or endorsement during clearance. Failure to do so may result in a delay in clearance or detention of your consignment. Action may be taken against importers who do not comply with requirements under the Endangered Species (Import and Export) Act.

After clearance, you have to submit the original copy of the foreign CITES permit NParks for recording. The imported quantity will then be updated into the LicenceOne system. If required, importers can apply for a CITES re-export permit online thereafter.

For more information on the import procedures of live plants and its products, please refer here.

 

Export and re-export of CITES-listed plants and plant products

Before exporting or re-exporting your CITES-listed plants and plant products, you are required to find out the import requirements of your country of destination. You can usually obtain information about these requirements from the website of the destination country’s relevant government authority.

Once you have obtained the necessary documentation (e.g. import permits) to fulfil the import requirements of your destination country, you can proceed to apply for a phytosanitary certificate via LicenceOne.

In Singapore, the phytosanitary certificate is recognised as a certificate of artificial propagation. It can be used in lieu of a CITES permit for the export or re-export of artificially propagated CITES-listed plant species under Appendix II or III.

Please refer to the following guide for the export and re-export requirements for CITES-listed plants and plant products:

Type Appendix Would you require a CITES export permit from NParks? Would you require a CITES import permit from country of destination? Remarks
Live plants (eg. Orchids, Cacti) I Yes Check with country of destination.  

Export and re-export is permitted only for artificially propagated CITES-listed species under Appendix I.

Export and re-export of wild CITES-listed species under Appendix I will be considered on a case-to-case basis.

   II and III

Artificially propagated CITES-listed plant species

Phytosanitary certificate is used in lieu of a CITES export or re-export permit.

Wild CITES-listed plant species

A CITES export or re-export permit is required.


Check with country of destination  
 Dead plants, parts and products (eg. manufactured products from Rosewood, Agarwood) I Yes **Check with country of destination. Approval for export or re-export will be considered only on a case-by-case basis.
  II and III Yes **Check with country of destination.  

*There are permit exemptions accorded to certain CITES-listed plant species. Please refer to “The Schedule of the Endangered Species (Import and Export) Act” for more details. If in doubt, please drop us a message here.

**Before arranging to ship out your CITES-listed plants or plant products, you are advised to check if a CITES import permit issued by the CITES authorities of your destination country is required. You can find the contacts of the CITES authorities here.

Please obtain all shipping documents including CITES permits and TradeNet Cargo Clearance Permits prior to the departure of your consignment from Singapore. For more information how to obtain the relevant permits, please refer to our guidelines here.

Please ensure that your CITES export or re-export permit is endorsed at the port of exit by NParks or ICA officers prior to departure. It is invalid without the endorsement and your shipment may be refused entry into or confiscated at the country of destination.

Transit or transhipment of CITES plants and products via Singapore (no local consignee)

For the transit or transhipment of CITES-listed plants and plant products through Singapore which does not involve a local consignee, the consignment must be accompanied by a CITES export or re-export permit from the exporting or re-exporting country and if required, a CITES import permit from the country of destination. Failure to ensure compliance with CITES may result in delay or detention of the consignment. Action may be taken against agents who do not comply with requirements under the Endangered Species (Import and Export) Act.

Last updated on 08 August 2019

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